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Salish Sea Sentinel | November 16, 2018

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Snaw-naw-as project no pipe dream

Snaw-naw-as project no pipe dream

Words and photos by Mark Kiemele

Sections of the pipe waiting to be fused

Sections of the pipe waiting to be fused

The parking lot outside the administration offices at Snaw-naw-as First Nation has been an unusual sight for the past two months.

On the asphalt leading to the boat ramp, contractors are building a 2,000-meter pipeline that will soon replace the Regional District of Nanaimo (RDN) marine outfall.

The project is providing employment for some Snaw-naw-as members as well as daily interesting activity for the community.

And it is also a source of revenue that will be used to further work on the nation’s latest economic development project above the waterfront along the Island Highway.

Work is progressing along the Island Highway

Work is progressing along the Island Highway

When complete, the pipeline will be towed to Morningside Park in Nanaimo for installation during the June to September 2016 fisheries window.

The new outfall will replace a pipeline installed in 1973 that is reaching the end of its functional life.

“I am excited to see this work coming closer to completion,” said RDN Chair Bill Veenhof.

“This is an essential project which will protect the surrounding environment and offer area residents dependable and reliable wastewater discharge for many years to come.”

Large smiles were worn by Serena Seymour, 7, and her sister Ciara, 5, who were visiting with their parents from Stz’uminus First Nation

Large smiles were worn by Serena Seymour, 7, and her sister Ciara, 5, who were visiting with their parents from Stz’uminus First Nation

The RDN provides wastewater treatment for the City of Nanaimo, Snuneymuxw First Nation and parts of the District of Lantzville adjacent to Snaw-naw-as. Treated effluent is discharged from a treatment plant through the pipe two kilometers into the Strait of Georgia along the sea floor.

McNally International is building the marine portion of the outfall.

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